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Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. He worked a series of odd writing and Internet jobs in Hong Kong and New York before landing as a news assistant at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering everything from economics to the presidential recount in Florida following the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He now works as an editorial writer for The New York Times but is leaving in August to become the paper’s Berlin bureau chief.

Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. He worked a series of odd writing and Internet jobs in Hong Kong and New York before landing as a news assistant at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering everything from economics to the presidential recount in Florida following the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He now works as an editorial writer for The New York Times but is leaving in August to become the paper’s Berlin bureau chief.

It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets [] of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. Groppi Cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him Uncle Tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen, in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large.

Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. He worked a series of odd writing and Internet jobs in Hong Kong and New York before landing as a news assistant at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering everything from economics to the presidential recount in Florida following the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He now works as an editorial writer for The New York Times but is leaving in August to become the paper’s Berlin bureau chief.

It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. Groppi Cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him Uncle Tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen, in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large. It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. Groppi Cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him Uncle Tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen, in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large.

Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. He worked a series of odd writing and Internet jobs in Hong Kong and New York before landing as a news assistant at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering everything from economics to the presidential recount in Florida following the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He now works as an editorial writer for The New York Times but is leaving in August to become the paper’s Berlin bureau chief.

It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. Groppi Cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him Uncle Tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen, in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large. It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. groppi cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him uncle tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen , in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large.

Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. After working at a magazine in Hong Kong at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up from assistant in New York to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering 9/11 at the Pentagon and the presidential recount in Florida after the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on the novel Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He joined the The New York Times in 2005 as an editorial writer. Between 2007 and 2013 he served as the paper's Berlin bureau chief, covering Central and Eastern Europe, from the war in Georgia to the European financial crisis. He is now the paper's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi.

Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. He worked a series of odd writing and Internet jobs in Hong Kong and New York before landing as a news assistant at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering everything from economics to the presidential recount in Florida following the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He now works as an editorial writer for The New York Times but is leaving in August to become the paper’s Berlin bureau chief.

It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. Groppi Cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him Uncle Tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen, in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large. It was a little more than five years ago that Souad Mekhennet and I wrote a story about the world's most-wanted Nazi fugitive, Dr. Aribert Heim. Authorities sought the former SS physician, accused of terrible crimes at Mauthausen concentration camp, in Chile. We discovered that he had been hiding not in South America but in Egypt. The Aryan former ice-hockey champion was living under the name Tarek Hussein Farid, a humble convert to Islam in a working class district of Cairo. In less than a week Doubleday will publish the book. In the meantime here is the that started it all: CAIRO — Even in old age the imposingly tall, athletic German known to locals as Tarek Hussein Farid maintained the discipline to walk some 15 miles each day through the busy streets of Egypt’s capital. He walked to the world-renowned Al Azhar mosque here, where he converted to Islam, and to the ornate J. Groppi Cafe downtown, where he ordered the chocolate cakes he sent to friends and bought the bonbons he gave to their children, who called him Uncle Tarek. Friends and acquaintances here in Egypt also remember him as an avid amateur photographer who almost always wore a camera around his neck, but never allowed himself to be photographed. And with good reason: Uncle Tarek was born Aribert Ferdinand Heim, a member of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS and a medical doctor at the Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen and Mauthausen concentration camps. It was behind the gray stone walls of Mauthausen, in his native Austria, that Dr. Heim committed the atrocities against hundreds of Jews and others that earned him the nickname Dr. Death and his status as the most wanted Nazi war criminal still believed by the Simon Wiesenthal Center to be at large.

Nicholas
author photograph © 2013 Tyler Hicks

NICHOLAS KULISH was born in Washington in 1975 and raised in Arlington, Virginia. He graduated from Columbia College in New York with a bachelor’s of arts degree. After working at a magazine in Hong Kong at The Wall Street Journal. He worked his way up from assistant in New York to staff reporter in the paper’s Washington bureau, covering 9/11 at the Pentagon and the presidential recount in Florida after the 2000 election. Kulish embedded with a Marine helicopter squadron for the invasion of Iraq, where he began working on the novel Last One In. He left the Journal to take a Fulbright creative-writing grant in Berlin. He joined the The New York Times in 2005 as an editorial writer. Between 2007 and 2013 he served as the paper's Berlin bureau chief, covering Central and Eastern Europe, from the war in Georgia to the European financial crisis. He is now the paper's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi.

My colleague in Nairobi, of the Washington Post, has an engaging about the ongoing search for justice in Rwanda. The small central African nation observed the 20th anniversary of the genocide this week, in which at least Tutsis and moderate Hutus (many put the figure well over a million) were killed in short order, often by friends and neighbors. “In our lifetime we shall continue to pursue them, and those who come after us will continue to pursue them, ” Jean Bosco Mutangana, a Rwandan prosecutor and head of the Genocide Fugitive Tracking Unit told Raghavan. “You cannot have reconciliation without real, true justice being done. ” The unit works out of adjacent homes in Kigali, the Rwandan capital. Reading about their work - and Rwandan society's halting efforts to come to terms with the genocide - reminded me so much of Germany in the 1960s. The equivalent of the Genocide Fugitive Tracking Unit, the in Ludwigsburg, was founded at the end of 1958. A small, dedicated team of prosecutors and police hunted perpetrators but ran into resistance from society at large, as well as colleagues with ties to the National Socialists. Rwanda is grappling with some of the same questions of how a nation comes to terms with such an unfathomable catastrophe and the presence of countless perpetrators plowing the fields or working at the corner store. As the Allies learned after World War II, it's impossible to lock up half a country. People would starve. It took Germany decades to come to terms with their collective guilt and begin to actively commemorate and vigorously prosecute. With Tutsis in top leadership positions from President Paul Kagame down that hasn't been the issue in Rwanda. There are plenty of other differences as well. For lower-level offenders, even those who committed multiple murders, local tribunals known as gacaca courts have been used that are closer to truth and reconciliation tribunals than criminal prosecutions. Many killers live side-by-side with their victims. Some have become friends - AP's a woman who became friends with a man who cut off her hand with a machete - but many more live unhappily and uneasily beside the people who killed their families. For those who haven't been, Rwanda is a small country of verdant terraced hills. It's a bit like if you photoshopped and filtered Tuscany until you made it so beautiful it verged on otherworldly. It is clean and orderly - Kigali has none of the chaos and congestion of Nairobi - but there's an underlying tension. People fear losing control. The government is betting that, again like Germany, its own economic miracle will keep a lid on tensions, as I earlier this month. So far it's worked. Rising living standards help but few people want to see a return to the dark days of April 1994. Photo courtesy of Rachel B. Doyle


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